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  • Allopurinol is an oral medication typically used to prevent uric acid and calcium oxalate stones in dogs. It is also used off-label to treat leishmaniasis and gout in dogs and other species. Side effects are uncommon but may involve stomach upset. Caution must be taken when allopurinol is used in conjunction with certain other medications. It should not be used in pets with liver or kidney dysfunction or in red-tailed hawks.

  • Topical ear medications are necessary for the treatment of most ear conditions in dogs. This article provides step-by-step instructions on how to apply ear medications along with precautions. Tips are also given to reduce your dog’s anxiety with ear treatment.

  • The proper administration of eye medications is essential for your pet's prompt recovery. Make sure you carefully read the label and understand the prescription instructions. If you have any questions, contact your veterinarian for clarification.

  • Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive therapy that is used to examine, diagnose, and treat diseases and conditions that affect joints. It requires a specialized piece of equipment called an arthroscope which will allow your veterinarian to look inside the joint using a small fiber optic camera that is hooked up to a monitor. It often requires general anesthesia; however, small incisions in the joint allow for a quicker recovery than traditional methods allow. The recovery time will depend on the extent of the injury, but compared to traditional surgery, recovery time is generally much shorter.

  • Atovaquone is given by mouth and is used off-label to treat protozoal infections. Give as directed. Side effects are uncommon but may include stomach upset or skin rash. Do not use in pets that are pregnant. If a negative reaction occurs, contact your veterinarian as soon as possible.

  • Bandages and splints protect an injured or wounded area of the body. It is important to closely monitor your dog’s bandage or splint to ensure it does not slip or become wet or soiled and to ensure there is no discharge or foul odors indicating infection. This handout explains optimal bandage and splint care for your dog at home as well as possible complications that will require veterinary attention.

  • Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are naturally occurring substances that are used to treat diseases or infections by affecting the immune system and how it works. They are mostly used to treat some cancers, immune-mediated diseases, or infections. Most BRMs are administered in the hospital under veterinary supervision. Side effects vary but may include fever, stomach upset, tiredness, or allergic reactions.

  • Pet owners may not realize that caffeine can be harmful to their pets. They also may not know that many foods and drinks in their cupboards contain caffeine. This particular chemical can be toxic for both cats and dogs.

  • Sometimes, the location of your dog’s wound or the amount of skin lost can prevent surgical closure or bandaging. This handout describes general guidelines for proper care of your dog's open wound at home, though your veterinarian can provide you with specific instructions.

  • The general instructions for incision care are the same for all surgical incisions. There may be some differences, however, depending on the type of surgery and the material used to close the incision. This handout is a guide to caring for your cat's surgical incision(s) at home for optimal recovery.

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